Zoom and 2U Error Update: What to Do When You Can’t Log In

There have been numerous instances in which a faculty member is not able to properly access their Zoom account and receives an error notice, or gets redirected to Zoom.com.

While Zoom accounts are meant to be linked to an email designed as “username@pepperdine.edu,” for faculty who teach in the 2PEP platform and “firstname.lastname@pepperdine.edu” for instructors who teach regular on-ground courses, these accounts are getting mixed up.

Evidently, random faculty accounts that have been mixed seem to have restrictions on their settings they otherwise would not have with their proper Pepperdine account. Pepperdine and 2U are currently collaborating to fix these Zoom accounts, and we apologize for any inconvenience this may cause.

To avoid this issue:
Please access 2U’s Zoom course sessions through the 2PEP platform.
Use pepperdine.zoom.us to access all other Pepperdine sessions such as regular JD course meetings and faculty or staff meetings.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact Information Services at support@law.pepperdine.edu or (310) 506-7425.

Using the Zoom Chrome Extension

The Zoom software offers multiple options to schedule a meeting, such as from the Zoom App (desktop or mobile), the Zoom Web Portal, or from a Zoom plugin (ChromeOutlookFirefox).

This post will go into detail on how to install the Zoom Chrome extension, specifically. The Zoom Chrome extensions allows participants to schedule or start Zoom meetings directly from Chrome, as well as schedule them from Google Calendar. You may learn more about the Zoom Chrome extension by visiting Zoom’s official documentation here, or continue reading to learn how to use and install the service.

1. To utilize the Chrome extension, you must first have the Chrome browser, which you may download here. Note that Chrome is compatible with Mac OS X 10.10 or later, and it is preferable to have the latest updated version.

2. If you are already using the Chrome browser (or if you have just finished successfully downloading it), next, you may download the Zoom Chrome extension from the Google Chrome Store by clicking here.

3. From the Chrome Store, select “Add to Chrome.”

4. A pop-up window will now appear to confirm you selection. To confirm and begin installation, select “Add extension.”

5. Shortly, you should now see the Zoom icon appear at the top of your browser menu, to the right of your search bar. Another pop-up menu will show asking whether or not you would like to sync these extension to all computers under this Google account; select your preferred choice.

6. Now, when selecting the extension’s icon, you will be asked to sign-in. To use your Pepperdine Zoom account, select “Sign In with SSO” at the bottom.

7. Next, enter your Pepperdine email address and password.

8. You will now be able to either schedule or start a meeting directly from your Chrome browser menu at any time.

9. Additionally, when logging on to the Google Calendar associated with your Pepperdine account, you may schedule any calendar event or invite as a Zoom meeting.

To do so, simply select on the time and day you would like to schedule a meeting on your calendar, and a pop-up window of details will appear. Adjust the meeting settings accordingly to fit your preferred title, date and time.

On this window, select “Make it a Zoom Meeting” on the bottom right.

10. You will now see the meeting created, alongside an automatic Zoom Meeting Link. To edit or view the details of this meeting, simply click on the scheduled event.

11. If you have shared this meeting with another individual, he or she will automatically receive an email with the Zoom Meeting invitation and link. If you would like to adjust any details on your created meeting, simply select the “Edit” pencil on the top menu of your scheduled event.

For more information on Zoom for faculty, please click here.

For more information on Zoom for students, please click here.

iClicker Account Set-Up for Students

1. Create a student account.

In a browser, go to the iClicker website and choose “Sign In” from the top right corner and then “Student”

2. When prompted for an institution, type Pepperdine University.

3. Click “Next” to confirm.

4. Fill out your account information.

5. Choose a password that follows the guidelines– and don’t forget it!

6. Congrats! Your account has been created. Click sign in with the account information you have just created.

7. Skip the remote registration.

8. Add a course by clicking the plus sign in the top right of your screen.

9. Under “Find your institution”, find Pepperdine University

10. Find your course by typing in the course name. It will show up when you start typing. Then select it from the option listed.

11. Check to see the information is correct, then add the course.

12. Now, under course lists, your class should appear.

13. Note the course history, statistics, and study tools within the class to aid in tracking your progression.

14. In class, enter the access code given by your professor. This will allow you to use iClicker for free.

  • Download the iClicker Reef app from the app store to your mobile device.

Metacognition for Students

This presentation will explore Metacognition, or the awareness and understanding of one’s own thought process. In understanding the different approaches to learning, you will be able to enhance your own learning as a student.

This presentation is compiled from the information presented in Sandra McGuire’s best-selling Metacognition book, “Teach Yourself to Learn: Strategies You Can Use to Ace Any Course at Any Level”. You can buy the book here.

In this presentation, we will cover:
Linking Concepts
Bloom’s Taxonomy
The Study Cycle

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Metacognition, literally “cognition about cognition”, or “thinking about thinking” is the process of understanding how you learn and includes knowledge about when and how to use particular strategies for learning or problem-solving. This understanding can manifest in being aware of oneself, and monitoring or judging one’s level of learning.

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The purpose of this presentation is to explain some strategies and self-evaluation techniques to equip you, as a student, realize your personal learning patterns and objectives.

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Remember: for highest efficiency, choose one or two techniques that you can feasibly implement into a studying routine. There is a lot covered in this presentation; see if there are one or two ways you can implement metacognition in your own academic life.

 Short-term benefits include:

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Increased metacognition awareness has been proven to massively improve test scores.

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This is not a one-off phenomenon; building strong learning habits is a continuous process that will continue to benefit you long-term.

The first metacognition strategy is linking concepts:

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To illustrate this concept, follow this exercise, and have a pen or pencil and paper ready. There will be a timer set for 45 seconds. On the next slide, count all the vowels you see until time runs out.

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Now, try to write down as many words as you can remember from the previous slide. If you’d like to calculate your score in percentage divide the number you remember by 15, and multiply by 100. The average is 3 phrases remembered, or 20%; did you beat the average?

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Looking at the list again, try to find the underlying pattern that orders the group.

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Now, repeat the exercise again- you will be given 45 seconds.

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 Did your average improve?

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This exercise illustrated the strategy “linking concepts”, in particular focusing on the overall goal. When the goal is clearly set (memorize the list) to match the expected outcome (write as many words as you can recall), the outcome is much improved.

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Secondly, and implementing a holistic, pattern-driven strategy helped to make the learning process familiar. By linking the words to numerical order, it was easier to recall the words in the exercise. In academia, the “linking concepts” approach remains relevant; connecting content to the overall goal, and making content relatable to things familiar to the student helps to format the learning experience to the student. 

For example, you may try to link the content or your readings to something you have encountered in everyday life, thus making the learning process tailored to your own experiences.

The second strategy is Bloom’s Taxonomy:

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Bloom’s taxonomy is a quantitative, measurable hierarchy. Each level of learning builds on the next, and to understand which level you are at versus which level you need to be at for the goals of the class is vital.

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The first stage is remembering, essentially rote memorization. The second is understanding the terms, characterized by the ability to paraphrase the content.

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The third is applying, where you can take the information you’ve understood and use it in new contexts that you have not seen before. Fourth is analyzing, where you can break the concept down into parts, and examine the constitution or structure of the concept.

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Fifth is evaluating, where you can take the concept you’ve learned and compare, contrast, and judge influences and competing ideals based on your knowledge of the concept. Lastly, sixth creating: in this stage, you are able to solve problems originally, building off of the knowledge of the concept.

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Differing from the buy-in to metacognition, which many view as simply raising grades, Bloom’s taxonomy challenges you to truly understand the material, identify how you, personally, interact with material, assess what you know, and shift study habits to engage in deeper learning.

After evaluating where you are on the taxonomy, how do you move higher, out of levels of memorization and into levels of deep comprehension? Use the study cycle!

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The cycle consists of 5 steps: Preview, attend class, review, intense study sessions, and assessment.

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The preview stage happens before class, where you skim over notes or completed homework to ascertain the learning objectives for class that day, and any questions you may have.

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The second stage is attendance; go to class, no matter what, and taking meaningful notes.

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Directly after class, you should review main concepts learned that day and review by reading over notes and answering questions.

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The fourth step is engaging in short study increments where you implement metacognition techniques.

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Periodically, you should pause and make sure that you fully understand the material you have studied. You may try assessing their stage in Bloom’s taxonomy; are you simply in the memorizing stage, or higher in the evaluating stage?

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In college, the level of material retention necessary to succeed in a class is higher than in high school. You should be aware of the Bloom’s stage they need to be at to succeed; typically, you should be at the analysis or synthesis stage.

Next is a model of the study cycle when applied to reading.

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As the student, you should be able to identify the questions the instructor needs to you answer before reading the text; skim the reading broadly first to understand the topics that will be covered in the reading.

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When reading the actual text itself, you should not go straight from beginning to end, instead you should read in chunks to fully digest the information in a feasible manner.

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It is vital that you attend class and take physical, hand-written notes, engaging completely with the material while in class.

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Homework should be done first without notes or a guide, and used as an assessment to see how well you understand the material covered in readings or class.

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In summary, using metacognitive strategies is deeply beneficial in you understand how you individually learn best, and how to format your study and class practices to master material. 

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Thank you for your interest and attention!

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact Information Services at support@law.pepperdine.edu or (310) 506-7425.

How the Brain Works

Here, we examine author and molecular biologist Dr. John Medina’s “Brain Rules,” a popular book on implementing brain science to classroom and professional dynamics. Medina lists 12 fundamental “brain rules” (what scientists know for sure about how our brains work), and many presented points are incredibly pertinent to molding the ideal learning environment.

The way our collective brains as a species have evolved is a truly fascinating and ongoing event. Possessing a deeper understanding of the way our minds function on both a mass and individual level allows us to hone our cognitive strengths, as well as revolve our routines to our benefit.

Separating the analysis between students and faculty, below are a few key takeaways for both sides of the classroom that are directly related to fostering a learning space that may maximize educational efficiency and retention.

Key Takeaways for Students

Rule #1: Exercise Boosts Brain Power
Exercise improves cognition for two reasons:
1. Exercise increases oxygen flow into the brain, which reduces brain-bound free radicals. One of the most interesting findings of the past few decades is that an increase in oxygen is always accompanied by an uptick in mental sharpness.2. Exercise acts directly on the molecular machinery of the brain itself. It increases neurons’ creation, survival, and resistance to damage and stress.

Rule #7: Sleep well, think well.
Sleep must be important because we spend 1/3 of our lives doing it! Loss of sleep hurts attention, executive function, working memory, mood, quantitative skills, logical reasoning, and even motor dexterity. Taking a nap might make you more productive. In one study, a 26-minute nap improved NASA pilots’ performance by 34 percent!

Rule #3: Every brain is wired differently.
What YOU do and learn in life physically changes what your brain looks like – it literally rewires it. We used to think there were just 7 categories of intelligence. But categories of intelligence may number more than 7 billion—roughly the population of the world. Learn which learning style is best for you, personally, and customize your studying style to learn effectively.

Rule #5: Repeat to remember.
Improve your memory by elaborately encoding it during its initial moments. Many of us have trouble remembering names. If at a party you need help remembering Mary, it helps to repeat internally more information about her. “Mary is wearing a blue dress and my favorite color is blue.” It may seem counterintuitive at first but study after study shows it improves your memory.

Key Takeaways for Faculty

Rule #4: We Don’t Pay Attention to Boring Things.
For instructors, it’s important to note that boredom is less of a matter of determination, but more of a matter of evolution. The topics and delivery methods that students pay attention to are profoundly influenced by predictive memory. Try to open main ideas and lectures with emotional and relevant anecdotes, or something attention grabbing to capture the students’ interests in seconds. Typically, an individual can maintain attention for only 10 minutes, and then requires a break and second boost of attention to restart the clock.

Rules #5 and #6: Repeat to Remember, Remember to Repeat.
Memories are very volatile. The human brain can only retain around seven pieces of information for less than 30 seconds; this is crucial for powerpoint presentations in terms of not overwhelming your audience with multiple facts on one slide. If an instructor would like to extend information retention to a few minutes or even an hour or two, the information must be consistently re-exposed to students in specifically times intervals through either examples, practice or checkpoint summaries.

Rule #10: Vision Trumps all other Senses.
The book describes the interconnection between sense and memories as a “learning link,” stating that multi-sensory environments will always lead to a better learning outcome. The human brain is incredible at remembering pictures, so to hear information presented alongside a visual stimulant will increase a student’s memory retention by 55 percent. It is also important to note that, during presentations, interpreting pictures is more efficient than interpreting text in terms of brain functionality.

Rule #8: Stressed Brains Do Not Learn the Same Way.
It is important to pay attention to the classroom dynamics that are created amongst peers and between the faculty and students. If an individual does not feel safe–whether that be physically or emotionally–he or she may not perform as well. A student may become isolated if they feel misunderstood by a teacher or disconnected with their teaching methods.

Rule #3: Every Brain is Wired Differently.
Lastly, it is essential to understand that every student enters the classroom with their own personally built set of developmental strengths and stress, short and long term memories, and overall varying levels of cognitive function. Every brain is wired differently, so it may behoove an instructor to attempt to integrate different pedagogical techniques to see what is best for the majority, or place separate, special attention to individuals who may require or seek other methods of learning and engagement.

Thank you for your interest and attention!

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact Information Services at support@law.pepperdine.edu or (310) 506-7425.

Alumni Email? Get your new email account! With benefits!

Hurray! You’ve graduated from Pepperdine Caruso School of Law! The last thing on your mind is your Pepperdine Email account, but there are some things you need to know…

  • COVID-19 NOTE: Student email accounts, WaveNet, and other network-related resources are governed by university policy and managed by the university IT department.Typically, student email accounts, WaveNet access, printing, Zoom, etc. would be deactivated 90 days after the 15th of the month following the date of graduation.In these unprecedented circumstances, this date is being pushed further out.  We do not yet have a fixed date for this but it is presently set to be 90 days after commencement. That’s the graduation ceremony, not the official graduation date which for Spring 2020 is 5/15/2020.

    At some point, recent graduates’ student email accounts will be deactivated by the university. When the commencement date is set, recent graduates will receive automated notifications in their student email inboxes 90, 60 and 30 days before account deactivation.

  • After graduation a process starts that begins with your status changing from student to alumnus.  This process involves a file transfer that takes place sometimes several days to a few weeks after graduation.  Sure, you have the diploma but the system doesn’t recognize you as an alumnus until that file is transferred from the student system to the alumni system. Typically this takes place about a month after the date of your graduation.  That’s when all the automated stuff starts up.
  • On the fifteenth day of the month immediately after your graduation date you will get an email to your student email account.  This email will give you the instructions and an important link you will need to setup your alumni email account… but you needn’t wait for that note, you can do it NOW by going here.
  • Note that student email accounts are disabled 90 days after the student’s last enrolled semester (90 days from the time of your entry into the alumni system — typically less than a month after Graduation day).
  • Once an account is deactivated the data/emails in that account it is not recoverable.

emailBut there’s good news. You’re an alumnus now!  Alumni may obtain a free, email account through Pepperdine’s Alumni Association. You can find more information on Alumni Email at this website.

Part of this process also includes instructions on how to easily migrate your Pepperdine Google Drive contents to a new Alumni Google Drive account!  The best benefit? UNLIMITED STORAGE!

After your student email address expires, no mail will be received at your student address. To make a smooth transition, the Alumni Association recommends:

  1. Set up your new alumni e-mail address immediately when you get that email noted above.
  2. Forward your mail in Wavenet to a new email address — that new alumni address or another one you prefer. (Note that forwarding will only work up until your student email account is suspended.)
  3. Set up an out-of-office message in your Pepperdine Student Email (accessed through Wavenet) account informing all your contacts of your graduation and of your new email address. Log into Wavenet click on Options, and then update your Out of Office Assistant.

Examplify Troubleshooting: Clearing Registration

If an exam is not appearing for downloading purposes in your Examplify account, you may need to clear your Examplify registration and log back in. Please follow the directions below:

*Note that you must be connected to internet in order to see the mock exam as available to download.

  1. Open Examplify and navigate to the Home Menu in the top right corner of your screen.

2. Select Settings from the drop-down menu.

3. You will be directed to a clear registration page; click on the green Clear Registration button.

4. To confirm your cleared registration, click the Clear Registration button again.

5. Finally, log back in to your Examplify account, and your exam should show up as available to download.

Please review our Examsoft Basics page and the Examplify Spring Final Guide page below for more information:

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact Information Services at support@law.pepperdine.edu or (310) 506-7425.

Graduating?! — Zoom/WaveNet/Email Access is NOT forever…Prepare!

CONGRATULATIONS!!!

You made it through!  Upon graduation, you will notice that things are changing for you.  This applies not only to your status as a person holding a prestigious degree, deference from family members, and a lot of attention from student loan officers, but also your status at Pepperdine has changed.  And, that’s a great thing.  But it’s change that you need to address.  Particularly with respect to your student email account.

Please note that upon graduation, your access to your Pepperdine Zoom, WaveNet, student email and all other services related to your WaveNet credentials will be deactivated a little over 90 days later.

All graduates will get reminder notices about their pending account suspension from an automated system 90 days, 60 days, and the final notice 30 days from their student email and network resources deactivation date.



NOTE: COVID-19 RELATED DELAY IN ACCOUNT DEACTIVATION

Student email accounts, WaveNet, and other network-related resources are governed by university policy and managed by the university IT department.

Typically, student email accounts, WaveNet access, printing, Zoom, etc. would be deactivated 90 days after the 15th of the month following the date of graduation.

In these unprecedented circumstances, this date is being pushed further out.  We do not yet have a fixed date for this but it is presently set to be 90 days after commencement. That’s the graduation ceremony, not the official graduation date which for Spring 2020 is 5/15/2020.

At some point, recent graduates’ student email accounts will be deactivated by the university. When the commencement date is set, recent graduates will receive automated notifications in their student email inboxes 90, 60 and 30 days before account deactivation.


We strongly recommend that new alumni opt-in to the Pepperdine alumni Google Suite which includes unlimited Google Drive storage and email for life.

It’s a good idea to plan ahead for this. Please see this site for more information: https://lawtech.pepperdine.edu/student-email-post-graduation/

Please make sure that you have an alternate email address setup. When you have your alternate address, put that alternate address in an auto reply/auto response message on your Pepperdine student email account to ensure that those who are attempting to reach you (prospective employers, lottery prize award officials, etc.) can do so via your new address.

If you are interested in getting a Pepperdine Alumni email account you can begin that process after graduation here: https://community.pepperdine.edu/it/alumni/email/

The above link will also provide helpful instructions on how to move your current student email contents, Google Drive contents, and contact information to a different email account.

Using Your Phone for Internet Access (Hotspots for iPhone and Android)

As Spring 2020 final exams approach during these unexpected times, you may be placed in a situation where you must use Examplify–or require any internet access, for that matter–in an area that has poor or no internet connection. If your phone plan allows it, please follow these instructions on how to set-up and utilize hotspots.

iPhone Users

  1. On your iPhone, go to “Settings” then “Cellular,” or “Settings” then “Personal Hotspot“.
  2. In order to allow others to join, tap the slider of “Personal Hotspot” to turn it on.
  3. Verify the Wi-Fi password and name of the phone. If you have not yet made a password, do so now. Stay on the personal hotspot screen until you’ve connected your other device to the Wi-Fi network.
  4. On your computer or device that you want to connect, go to “Settings” then “Wi-Fi” and look for your iPhone or iPad in the list
  5. Click on your iPhone or iPad’s Wi-Fi network to join. If applicable, enter the password you have created for your Personal Hotspot.
  6. Once connected, your device should display a blue bar at the top to verify usage of your hotspot.

To view more information and instructions on Apple’s support page, please click here.

Android Users

  1. To turn on your phone’s hotspot, open “Settings”.
  2. Go on “Network & internet,” then “Hotspot & tethering.”
  3. From here, select “Wi-Fi hotspot” and turn it on by selecting the switch to blue.
  4. To change a hotspot setting or create a password. If you have not already set up a hotspot, first tap “Set up Wi-Fi hotspot” and follow the instructions provided. If you do not wish for your hotspot to require a password, select “None” under “Security.”
  5. On the other device that you would like to connect, open the list of Wi-Fi options and search for your phone’s hotspot name.
  6. Enter your phone’s hotspot password and click “Connect.” You may share your phone internet with a total of 10 mobile devices.

To view more information and instructions on Google’s support page, please click here.

EXAMPLIFY INSTRUCTION GUIDE FOR SPRING 2020 FINAL EXAMS

The following guide is intended to walk you through the process of taking your Spring 2020 Final Examinations.  Please read these instructions carefully.

Unless you are otherwise notified by your professor, all final examinations will be administered remotely as “open book/open note/open Internet” exams this term. 

  • You will have the ability to “toggle” between your exam attachment, electronic notes, the Internet, and your essay responses in ExamSoft. 
  • Your exams will be timed.  You are responsible for starting the exam at the time you are scheduled to take the exam and uploading your exam on or before the time the e-mailed instructions indicate you must end the exam.  You are responsible for time-keeping if you begin the exam later than its scheduled time.  If you begin the exam late, the timer may suggest that you have time remaining, but the deadline for uploading your exam is the time indicated in the instructions.
  • You are responsible for following the instructions as well as the honor code, which are included with every exam. Your exam submission indicates your certification that you have read, understand, and agree to be bound by the terms of the Pepperdine Caruso Law Honor Code, which applies with equal force to examinations submitted online.

Before taking your first exam, please do the following:

For further reference concerning requirements, installation and re-registration instructions and other features of Examsoft’s Examplify, please click here.

STARTING AND COMPLETING THE FINAL EXAM

On the day and time scheduled for your Spring 2020 final exam, an email will be sent to your class with exam-specific instructions, including the exam start and end time, password, and contact information should you require immediate assistance during your exam.

(Please note:  If you have been approved and scheduled to take the exam on another day or time, you will receive this information on the day/time your exam was originally scheduled.  Please save this information for the time your exam is scheduled. Your exam timer will begin the moment you enter the exam password. Do not enter your password until you are ready to take the exam.)

Once you have received the e-mail with your password information, please log-into Examplify and click on the exam you are taking in ExamSoft.

1. Under “My Exams” on the left-hand side of the screen, look for the name of the the exam you are taking and select it/click on it.

2. Enter the exam password that was e-mailed to you at the start of the exam.
(Note: this password is case-sensitive and must be entered exactly as shown).

3. Please read and acknowledge the “Exam Notice,which is the Pepperdine Caruso School of Law honor code for remote exams. (A copy is attached to this document for your thorough review.) Please read and scroll down to the bottom of the screen before clicking “Next” to accept the terms of the honor code.

4. The “Exam Controls” screen will appear, indicating that the exam includes an attachment and instructions where it can be found under the drop-down menu, “Exam Attachments.”

5. The screen, “Please wait until instructed to start” will appear.  Please disregard this statement to start your exam by clicking “Continue.”

6. Next, please check the box, “I am authorized to start my exam,” then click “Start Exam.”

7. Once you have entered the exam itself, you will have the ability to “toggle” between your computer notes, the Internet, the exam attachment, and your response.

As indicated above, you may access the exam attachment by clicking on “Exam Controls” on the top menu, then “Exam Attachments” on the drop-down menu.

8. A pop-up window of the exam will appear on your screen.To open and/or print the Exam attachment in your PDF reader, please click on the printer icon/Print.

9. The exam will appear in your PDF reader and allow you to Print from its application, typically using the printer icon at the top of the screen.

10. Please type your answer in the space provided. There is a  timer at the top of your screen. (Please note: It is your responsibility to start and end your exams on time.  Your exams must be uploaded by the exam end time and will not allow for a “late start/end time.”)

11. Once you are finished with the exam, click “Finish” at the bottom right hand corner.

  •  a. Before the time expires, you can upload your exam, as you typically do in
    Exam Controls as shown below.  
  • b. IF the timer expires, a screen will appear to inform you that your “Time Limit is Reached,” and the exam will be uploaded for youPlease keep track of your time to ensure your exam is uploaded at the scheduled end time.

c. If the time limit expired and your exam was uploaded for you, you will see the following screen, which will indicate the status of the upload:

  • If you have manually uploaded your exam, you will be asked to confirm the completion of your exam. If you are certain that you would like to submit your exam, check the box and click “Submit Exam.”

13. PLEASE make sure your exam is completely uploaded. Wait until you receive the green screen, “Your exam has successfully uploaded.”  Do not close your laptop until you see this screen.

(Please Note: If you do not receive an email confirmation of your exam submission, please open your laptop again to complete the upload process.)

Once you see this  green screen, you may click “Return to Dashboard.”

HONOR CODE STATEMENT FOR REMOTE EXAM TAKING – SPRING 2020

The following statement will be attached to every exam you will be taking this term. By clicking “NEXT” and entering the password for your exam, you agree to the following:

By checking the box below, you certify that you understand that the terms of the Pepperdine Caruso Law Honor Code apply with equal force to examinations administered online.  [link to the full policy]

In particular, you are aware of the following non-exhaustive examples of prohibited conduct that specifically apply to exams:

1. to consult with any other person during an examination, unless expressly authorized by the instructor;

2. to edit overtime on an examination;

3. to obtain unauthorized information concerning an examination one is to take, without immediately informing the Dean;

4. to take an examination for another student;

5. to divulge the contents of an objective or essay examination (note: all exams being administered online this semester should be considered as designated as an examination ‘not to be removed from the virtual examination room’)

6. to intentionally and unnecessarily disturb others taking an examination;

7. to incorporate into work offered for credit any passages taken either word for word or in substance from any work of another without properly crediting the original author and work;

8. to submit as one’s own work the work of another;

9. to submit for credit work that has been previously offered for credit or submitted to a journal;

10. to submit for credit work prepared in collaboration with another without securing the instructor’s permission in advance of submission;

11. to improperly reveal to a professor one’s identity in connection with an examination which is to be graded on an anonymous basis;

12. to unlawfully possess, distribute, or use prescription drugs without proof of prescription, to enhance academic performance;

In addition, it is a violation of the Honor Code to willfully fail to fulfill the duty owed by every law student to report promptly to the Board Chairperson or the Dean all circumstances which he or she believes to constitute a violation of the Honor Code and to identify the person or persons involved.

An honor code investigation may include, but is not limited to, collecting electronic data from computers, phones, and other potentially relevant data sources.  Violations of the Honor Code are extremely serious, can cause sanctions including expulsion, and must be reported to the bar examiners as part of the moral character determination, thus potentially hampering your ability to ever practice law.

IF YOU NEED ANY TECHNOLOGY ASSISTANCE, PLEASE FEEL FREE TO REACH OUT TO INFORMATION SERVICES AT (310) 506-7425 OR SUPPORT@LAW.PEPPERDINE.EDU. GOOD LUCK!