TWEN

TWENTWEN, The West Education Network (http://lawschool.westlaw.com): This is an online course management system where students’ can access course materials, submit assignments via Drop Box, sign-up for office hours (if available), take polls and quizzes, participate in class discussions, and exchange e-mail messages with your students.  The extent of your class TWEN usage is up to you, the professor, and your course objectives and goals.

Register on TWEN: In order to use TWEN you must first register your username and password. If you have already done this in order to use Westlaw, then you do not need to re-register for TWEN .  Westlaw, Westlaw Next and TWEN are all included in the same web site and registration is only required once.

For more information on TWEN, attend the Coffee Talk session on June 27 from 2-3 pm in the Law Library Learning Lab (Room 219). Melissa Hagar will be presenting on commonly used features.

TWEN and Courses by Sakai

Both TWEN and Courses are utilized by both students and faculty for effective classroom communication. Read on to learn more about these course management systems.

 

TWEN

TWEN, The West Education Network (http://lawschool.westlaw.com): This is an online system where students can access course materials, submit assignments via Drop Box, sign-up for office hours (if available), take polls and quizzes, participate in class discussions, and exchange e-mail messages with instructors and peers.  The extent of your TWEN use will depend on your professors’ course objectives and goals.

Register on TWEN: In order to use TWEN you must first register your username and password. If you have already done this in order to use Westlaw, then you do not need to re-register for TWEN .  Westlaw, Westlaw Next and TWEN are all included in the same web site and registration is only required once. You should have received your activation code at Orientation or via email (your Pepperdine account). If you feel that you have not received an activation code, email gilbert.marquez@pepperdine.edu with the subject line: WESTLAW ACTIVATION CODE.

Watch the video below for step-by-step instruction on how to register your password on Westlaw.

View/Access Courses on TWEN: In order to view and access all of your courses, you must first ADD the course manually. Watch the video below for step-by-step instructions on how to add courses in TWEN.

For additional resources visit, Students’ Guide to TWEN.

 

 

 

Courses

Courses is Pepperdine’s open-source, learning management system that offers faculty and students a collaborative online environment to support teaching andlearning. Basic features of Courses allow faculty to post syllabi, grades, and announcements. For more information, visit the University’s Courses Community page.  Watch the video below to learn more about the basic features of Courses and view the user interface. For step-by-step instructions and a list of FAQs, please visit Pepperdine’s Courses Student Guide.

 

 

Interactive Features of TWEN

Westlaw LogoThe West Education Network (TWEN) is an online extension of the law school classroom. It is a tool that many professors currently use to post syllabi, course notes and resources, and assignment information. However, there are many additional interactive features of TWEN that are either unknown or rarely utilized. I will highlight a few of those:

Sign-Up Sheets: These can be used to set up office hours and schedule student conferences. They can also be used for students to sign up for paper topics and/or in-class presentation times. Essentially, if there is something you need students to sign-up for, this is the tool for you! You choose the dates and times and set the parameters for cancellation. TWEN also makes it easy to set up regularly scheduled office hours for the entire semester in a matter of minutes.

Customized Polling: Create polls that students can respond to anonymously. You can poll the class with the following types of questions: yes/no, true/false, and multiple choice. Use these polls in class our outside of class. Polling is done within TWEN and you can view the results visually as a bar graph or pie chart.

Wiki: Within this section of TWEN, you set up pages that can be collaboratively edited by faculty and/or students. You can specify who can view each page and who can edit each page. This is a great feature for activities or assignments where two or more students or faculty are working together to create a product.

These are just a few of many interactive features now available on TWEN. Next time you, the faculty, are organizing your course on TWEN, consider ways in which you can integrate these components effectively into your classroom instruction.

 

Integrating Technology into Legal Education

I’m not new to educational technology, but I am new to legal education. I’m also new to Pepperdine School of Law. As such, I recently administered an anonymous technology survey to law faculty in order to gauge their level of interest in educational technology and how it can be used to enhance teaching and learning. I will use this post as an opportunity to share with you two key findings:

Faculty Take Interest in their Students’ Learning Experience: At Pepperdine, faculty care about their students’ learning experience. 100% of respondents indicated that enhancing student engagement during class was their primary objective. Other popular objectives included:

  • Incorporating Active Learning techniques and in-class exercises
  • Enhancing learning with multimedia
  • Enhancing student engagement outside of class
  • Improving student assignments

Faculty are Interested in Technology: Faculty are interested in incorporating a variety of technology tools into their classroom. Here are just a few specific approaches of interest mentioned:

  • Document Sharing/Collaboration
  • Multimedia
  • Delivery of Online Content
  • Simulations
  • Feedback Surveys/Instruments
  • Clickers
  • Online Tutorials (to supplement course work)
  • Lecture Capture

Information Services Department LogoOne way the Information Services Department at the School of Law will assist faculty in the integration of technology is by providing regularly scheduled, hands-on learning sessions. These learning sessions will present practical and relevant ways in which faculty can integrate technology effectively into their classroom. The first learning session will be held on Monday June 11th at 12:30PM. Professor McNeal will lead the session with his experiences using clickers, and will present meaningful ways in which others can join him in using this tool to improve student outcomes.