Westlaw Registration Tutorial

  • Use your Pepperdine credentials to log into WaveNet.
  • Once in, click on the Westlaw Link.

  • You will be redirected to the Westlaw OnePass Sign-In page.
  • Click the Create a new OnePass profile link.

  • Enter any email address you would like. Click the Continue button.

  • Fill out the form in order to register a new OnePass profile.
  • Click the Create Profile button.

  • After completing the form, click Return to Link Credentials
    on the left side of the page.

  • Enter your username and password, then click the Sign In button.

  • You should automatically be logged in. Otherwise, if you have not completed registration, an error will appear. Click the blue link to register your
    password code that you were given.

  • You will be redirected to the following page.
  • Follow the Click here link for “Registering for the First Time?

  • Enter the email address you previously used to register.

  • Now enter your username and password.
  • Click the go button.

  • Enter in your Westlaw password code.
  • Click the go button.

  • Fill out the OnePass registration form with your information.
  • Then click the I Agree button at the bottom.”

  • Enter your username and password to sign into
    the Westlaw website.”

  • You are all set! Moving forward, you will not need to enter in
    your OnePass username & password when you log into WaveNet.
  • You will automatically be signed in.

  • If you have any questions contact Law Computing Support at x7425.

Change Your Password

Login Form Image

You’ve probably seen or heard of the myriad of recent news headlines where popular organizations like Twitter or Evernote have been hacked. These organizations assure us that our data is not compromised, and advise us to change our passwords or they promptly change our passwords for us to reduce the amount of damage a hacker can do. There is often more to the story, and even passwords we think are quite clever may be cracked with relative ease. The blog Ars Technica featured a couple of stories recently about passwords, which I recommend you read. There are a few examples of presumably safe passwords that were cracked with relative ease. The first article described how a blog editor managed to crack passwords with some basic tools, and can be found here. The second is a follow-up article, where the consulting hackers took a shot at the same list. You can view that one here. They are both fairly detailed but I encourage you to read all the way to the end.

There is a convenient graphic that illustrates the complexity of certain passwords, which I also encourage you to read. It can be found here.

Safe passwords are hard(er) to crack. You cannot rely on a website to properly encrypt your password, as we have seen in the news so often lately. Password managers can be a useful tool to generate random passwords for you, if you are concerned you cannot come up with a good password. The downside is that these passwords will be nearly impossible to remember, which then requires a master password that you can remember. There are a number of password applications out there, KeePass and LastPass among the more popular options. Which one you choose is up to you. Be sure to look for apps for your chosen smartphone as well, so you can be safe from whatever device you are using.

Our own Julie Tausend also recently wrote a post on information security. In it, you’ll find links to university services and policies that can be useful to you in securing your information. You can also go straight to the source for passwords and other types of security at community.pepperdine.edu/it/security.

Be safe out there, and be sure to CHANGE YOUR PASSWORDS!